FanPost

"There's gotta be some kind of penalty or fine." - Idea thread for navigating trade requests

Today a read an interesting article on Bleacher Report that tackles the ongoing Kyrie and Simmons sagas in the context of star player trade requests. Obviously, we went through our thing with Kawhi, and we know all too well how one player's whims can cripple a franchise. Here is a passage from the article that sums up the topic:

--

"There's gotta be some kind of penalty or fine," said one assistant general manager. "These guys sign the supermax and they want to get traded the next day."

"It is the new trick of the trade," agreed one longtime agent.

Proposals have varied, but they largely center on something that would be a reverse trade kicker of sorts, where players can receive a maximum bonus of 15 percent of their salary if a team decides to move them. Some team officials want to see a player who requests a trade forfeit upwards of 70 percent of his salary. Others have told B/R about what seems like a far more realistic scenario, where the player in question would only make 60 percent of his guaranteed money once he requests a new team.

https://bleacherreport.com/articles/2949384-sources-kyrie-irving-ben-simmons-sagas-could-lead-to-nba-rule-changes

--

So what are your ideas for how this problem can be navigated? There's no right or wrong answer, no dumb answers, just an open conversation to be had about the issue at hand. Personally, I like the notion that players can request trades and be in charge of their own destiny. Contracts are broken in business all the time - it happens. So you just figure out how to make it a survivable event for all parties and move forward.

Currently, the gravity that star players hold is way too high, while everyone else in the league seems to have little say in anything at all. So my thoughts are with helping those players gain freedom, while keeping both stars and franchises in check for saying one thing and then doing another.

Any ideas?

This is fan-created content on PoundingtheRock.com. The opinion here is not necessarily shared by the editorial staff at Pounding the Rock.